Monthly Archives: June 2019

Watertown High School Students Learn to Rethink Their Drinks

On April 9, 2019, Framingham State University student Laura Villani taught 9th-12th grade consumer science students at Watertown High School in Watertown, MA.

Students learned how to calculate how many teaspoons of sugar were in their favorite beverage based on the nutrition facts label.

Students learned how to calculate how many teaspoons of sugar were in their favorite beverage based on the nutrition facts label.

She taught the students about the various risks to their health from regularly consuming sugar-sweetened beverages through a lesson titled “Rethink Your Drink”. Watertown Public School’s School Wellness Policy states that the district’s food service & nutrition department strives to provide students with quality nutrition education that helps them develop lifelong healthy eating behaviors. Through Framingham State’s Coordinated Program in Dietetics , student dietitians like Laura visit various schools throughout the state each week to help them achieve these nutrition education goals.

The class compared the amount of sugar in their favorite beverages using sugar packets.

The class compared the amount of sugar in their favorite beverages using sugar packets.

During the “Rethink Your Drink” lesson, students learned about some of the possible health risks associated with the over-consumption of sugary drinks. They also learned where to find the sugar content on the Nutrition Facts Panel, how to calculate how many teaspoons of sugar were in their drinks, and some tasty, lower-sugar alternatives to their usual beverages. After calculating how many teaspoons of sugar were in their favorite drinks, the students got to compare their findings with the rest of the class by counting out sugar packets and putting them on display.

For more information on how to reduce sugar in schools, please visit the John Stalker Institute’s Sugar Solutions for Schools resource page.

Submitted by: Laura Villani, FSU Food and Nutrition Student in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

 

Dedham Public School Students Learn About the Nutrients Found in Food

Dedham Public schools is dedicated to promoting nutrition education for students, as shown in their school nutrition program webpage. Their webpage includes all nutrition services provided to the students, the meals offered, as well as the district’s Wellness Policy. The district’s goal is to create school environments that promote and protect lifelong health and well-being. On April 22nd, Dedham Public Schools teamed up with Framingham State University’s Coordinated Program in Dietetics and invited student dietitian, Abigail Boatemaa, to teach 10th  and 11th  grade students about the nutrients found in food.

FSU student dietitian, Abigail Boatemaa, teaches Dedham 10th and 11th graders about the nutrients found in food.

FSU student dietitian, Abigail Boatemaa, teaches Dedham 10th and 11th graders about the nutrients found in food.

During this lesson, the students learned about the six nutrients found in food (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water). Students were taught to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables in order to get all of these essential nutrients. Students participated in activities, such as identifying nutrients found in food using food models. Each student got a chance to share their favorite food, which nutrients they gain from this food, and gave tips to their peers on how to incorporate a variety of healthy foods in their diet.

 

For more information on improving nutrition education in schools, visit The John C. Stalker Institute of Food and Nutrition’s Resource Center.

Submitted by: Abigail Boatemaa, FSU  Food and Nutrition Student Coordinated Program in Dietetics

Andover High School Students Learn How to Eat Mindfully

Andover Public Schools is a leader in their health education. The food service department and teachers work hard to ensure students are provided nutrition education to help them carry healthy habits outside of the classroom. It is part of the goal of the Andover School wellness policy to gear health education toward personal behaviors and habits, to resist peer and wider pressures to make unhealthy choices, and to emphasize learning and practicing skills students need for healthy living.

In making these wellness policy goals a reality, Andover has partnered with Framingham State University and their Coordinated Program in Dietetics to provide nutrition education to their students.

FSU Student Dietitian Taelyr Hair teaching students about the importance of eating mindfully to enjoy food and avoid overeating.

FSU Student Dietitian Taelyr Hair teaching students about the importance of eating mindfully to enjoy food and avoid overeating.

Student dietitian Taelyr Hair taught high school students at Andover the art of eating mindfully by using all five senses to enjoy food, practice healthy skills, and work on their personal habits and behaviors. Many students identified issues with overeating while playing on their phone or watching TV. Most of the students had never heard of mindful eating, and this new way of thinking about their food surprised them. Students participated in an activity in which they had to mindfully eat a snack food and report descriptions for each of their five senses when experiencing the snack. By the end of the lesson, all of the students had come up with multiple descriptions for each of their senses and expressed that they liked the idea of putting more focus on their food experiences, and slowing down while eating.

To explore more resources on mindful eating and other interesting lesson plans to implement in your school, please visit The John C. Stalker Institute of Food and Nutrition resource center.

Submitted by: Taelyr Hair FSU Graduate Food and Nutrition Student, Coordinated Program in Dietetics.  

Needham Middle School Students Learned About Food Marketing

Framingham State University Coordinated Program in Dietetics student Nicole Minnelli and Rebecca Drown partnered up with 7th grade health classes at Pollard Middle School in Needham, Massachusetts. As stated in Needham’s wellness policy and in the health education curriculum, the goal of the program is to promote healthy behaviors and a dedication to wellness. Needham Nutrition Services supports nutrition education by offering unlimited fruits and vegetables with a meal.

Nicole taught the 7th grade students about food marketing through a lesson called “Design a Cereal.” The lesson included an overview of how people are influenced, or deceived, by marketing on food products. Using cereal boxes, students worked in groups to discuss which marketing strategies such as colors, slogans or health claims were used to entice the buyer to purchase that specific cereal. The students were also asked, just by looking at the box, if they thought this was a healthy cereal choice.

“Fruit Cubes,” a colorful cereal box designed by some of the students, who also used Rob Gronkowski as their sponsor!

“Fruit Cubes,” a colorful cereal box designed by some of the students, who also used Rob Gronkowski as their sponsor!

Students learned what to look for when purchasing a cereal and how to read a nutrition facts label to detect a healthy cereal even when the outside of the box might disagree. Students discussed protein, fiber and sugar in relation to healthy cereals.

Each group then created a healthy cereal on their iPads using marketing strategies discussed. The creativity from these students made for a fun, interactive lesson while they used key nutrition information learned earlier in their lesson to design a healthy cereal.

Students stated they had fun during this lesson and felt like they learned something as well.

To find lesson plans and ways to incorporate nutrition education in the classroom, visit The John Stalker Institute Resource Center for ideas.

Submitted by: Nicole Minnelli, Food and Nutrition Student in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

Milford Public School Students Learn About MyPlate

The Milford Public School district is dedicated to their Wellness Policy and aims to provide their students with nutrition education and the knowledge that will help them to sustain a healthy lifestyle. Also, the school’s  Nutrition Program page provides Newsletters for parents that have information about the harvest of the month and healthy recipes. To further the promotion of their Health and Wellness Policy, Milford Public Schools has partnered with Framingham State University’s Coordinated Program in Dietetics to provide appropriate nutrition lessons to Milford Public School students.

In the Spring of 2019, Framingham State University student Sara El-Rifai taught second grade students at Memorial Elementary School in Milford, MA. She taught the students about MyPlate and the importance of incorporating all five food groups into their diets through a lesson titled “MyPlate, Myself”. During the lesson, students learned about the five food groups and examples of food that belong to each of the food groups.

Framingham State University student dietitian Sara El-Rifai educated 2nd graders at Memorial Elementary School about the five food groups and MyPlate.

Framingham State University student dietitian Sara El-Rifai educated 2nd graders at Memorial Elementary School about the five food groups and MyPlate.

For an activity, students were given different food cards and were asked to think about which food group their food belongs to. Students were also able to color in their own MyPlate and draw down their favorite foods from each food group. Students were excited to learn about the five food groups and MyPlate and they enjoyed the activities.

For more information regarding nutrition education and amazing education resources visit The John C. Stalker Institute of Food and Nutrition at Framingham State University and the  JSI resource center

Submitted by: Sara El-Rifai Framingham State University Graduate Food and Nutrition Student, Coordinated Program.

Memorial Elementary School Gets Up and Moving for “Sometimes Foods” and MyPlate

Milford Public Schools believes that a winning recipe for a healthy lifestyle is a combination of both good nutrition and physical activity. This is reflected in their Wellness Policy that emphasizes the importance of nutrition and fitness and the incorporation of those into the education of the students. This integration includes health education and physical education. In additions, the Milford Public Schools Food and Nutrition page includes menus, tips for eating healthy, and activities for kids, their families and teachers.

In expanding their current health education goals, Memorial Elementary School invited Robby Guarino, a student currently enrolled in the Framingham State University Coordinated Program in Dietetics, to teach a gym class of 1st grade and 2nd grade students. Robby presented a lesson involving MyPlate and how some foods are “sometimes foods” and that there are healthier options that can be eaten more frequently.

Robby teaching 1st and 2nd graders about “sometimes foods” and MyPlate at Memorial Elementary School in Milford, MA.

Robby teaching 1st and 2nd graders about “sometimes foods” and MyPlate at Memorial Elementary School in Milford, MA.

The lesson included using food models to see if the students could identify the food group it belonged to and if it was a “sometimes food” or not. The students then engaged in a physical activity where there were six colored hula-hoops around the gym, one for each of the five food groups with each hoop being the color of its corresponding food group and a yellow one for “sometimes foods”. Robby would shout out the name of a food and the students would have to run to the hula-hoop for the food group that the food belonged to. The students really enjoyed the activity as it got both their bodies and brains moving!

For more information and ideas, not just for nutrition education, but overall wellness education as well, visit The John C. Stalker Institute Resource Center. The Lessons for Elementary, Middle, and High Schools page is a great way to get started in implementing more nutrition education into the curriculum!

Submitted by Robby Guarino, FSU Graduate Food and Nutrition Student in the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.